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Under Armour Drive 4 Performance Reviews


Traction: Under Armour doesn’t mess around here; it has used what has been proven to work for years and that would be full-length herringbone. Not only did UA use a tried and true formula, it made the tread thick and deep so it’ll last longer (shout out to all our outdoor ballers). Also, dust has less of a chance of getting caught in between the grooves since the pattern is spaced out very nicely.

The rubber compound could’ve been a little tackier but that didn’t keep these from working on virtually every floor condition you can think of. However, since they’re not as tacky as something like the Kobe 9s I did have to wipe every now and then when the floor was in less than ideal conditions.

It’s also worth mentioning that the outsole started to separate from the midsole. If you take a look at the 4:07 mark in the video above, you’ll see the outsole separation. I didn’t notice this during use but honestly, I’m not surprised by the wear and tear since I easily put about 50 hours of playing time in these. If you’re looking for something that’ll last you an entire season, these might not be for you.

Cushion: Under Armour could’ve and should’ve used full-length MicroG, but instead it only used it in the heel — that’s the equivalent of having a really nice crossover but no jumper.

We’re assuming that the forefoot is just straight EVA foam which could be worse but when compared to the MicroG in the heel, it’s obsolete. It can feel dead at times but the silver lining is that you’re going to get a real responsive ride that is very low to the ground — those guards who don’t really get up in the air are really going to like how quick the forefoot feels. However, more explosive players are going to wish there was more impact protection and bounce, kind of like the Micro G section in the heel.

I don’t know why UA didn’t just put Micro G full-length. The good news is that I never felt sore at the end if my runs so the while the cushion could’ve been a lot better, what we do get isn’t bad at all

Materials: It looks like ClutchFit is going extinct on the hardwood because Under Armour decided to replace it in the Drive line with what it calls a lightweight and breathable textile upper. It’s basically a woven mesh material that doesn’t really stretch but at the same time isn’t very stiff or uncomfortable, it’s kind of just there. The materials aren’t terrible but they aren’t amazing either. However, the neoprene-like padding in the medial forefoot and collar area was very comfortable.

The downside of the materials is that they don’t really conform to your foot for a snug one-to-one fit. There’s quite a bit of dead space in the toebox area and no matter how tight I laced them up, the materials just did not snap to my foot the way they should. Under Armour curry 4 black gold also says that the upper is breathable but trust me, it isn’t. It isn’t really a big deal, they’re not a hot box by any means, but they will start to smell pretty bad after just a couple of uses

Fit: Wide-footers listen up,  you should seriously consider putting these on your radar because a wide fit like this doesn’t come around very often. 

Like I said in the materials section, there was a ton of dead space towards the front of the shoe and while the length and overall fit of the Drive 4 was true to size, I just couldn’t get the materials to snap to the front of my foot the way I wanted them to. The midfoot area was snug and responsive just as long as I tied the laces up nice and tight. Moreover, the back end of the shoe, towards the heel area, also provided a less than ideal fit. It isn’t as bad as the forefoot but there was definitely some wiggle room that couldn’t be eliminated.

There was also some stabbing in this area on hard cuts and drives where the heel cup would go under my ankle and pinch against my foot. When this happened, it was not comfortable whatsoever and one night in particular, there was nothing I could do to avoid it. Oddly enough, after that one night, the problem didn’t really come back to me so i’m not sure if I broke these in or I just got used to it, but when it did happen, it was pretty annoying. If you’re a side to side mover who does a lot of v-cuts and goes from baseline to baseline, you might also experience this issue, but the problem did eventually go away.

Support: Despite the loose fit, the Drive 4 does a solid job keeping you on your feet thanks to its wide fit that in turn provides a wide base. That wide platform in the forefoot, coupled with the low to the ground cushioning, made for a very responsive and stable ride that is going to favor quick guards or anyone who doesn’t really get off of the ground.

The heel cup also did a pretty good job with lateral stability but like I said, it did cut into my ankle a few times so perhaps it does too good of a job. The lacing system is another star feature in the Drive 4’s support system because it does a very good job at keeping your foot in place — it just doesn’t do a good job snapping the materials to your foot but this is more of a weird feel than a knock on its actual performance.

You’re not going to get top tier performance in this category for the Drive 4 but you will get everything you need to keep you on your feet during play. (You’re going to get a different experience depending on how it fits.) If you can fill in a lot of the dead space that these have, the support will be above average; if you can’t fill in those dead spaces, internal slipping may be an issue.

Overall: Look, as much as we want a sneaker shoes that costs $115 and provides top tier performance, it just isn’t that common. The Drive 4 is about what you would expect from a sneaker at this price. There are some good things it does (traction) and then there are some things that need work (fit and materials). 

Sure, the outsole separation is pretty bad but the good news is that it didn’t affect my play on the court. Also, the wide fit could be viewed as a positive since wide-footers are always saying that shoe companies don’t provide enough wide-footer friendly models. For better or worse, Under Armour gave you guys what you wanted — even if it may have been by accident. Overall, if you’re someone who plays low to the ground, prefers a stable ride and has a wide foot, these are going to be great for you, just be aware of the lackluster impact protection — and watch out for that heel cup. http://www.kd10sale.com
11:43:55 25 Augustus 2017 Permanente link Reacties (0)

Nike Kyrie Low Performance Review


Kyrie Irving’s sneakers have been a huge hit with players of all ages since the first model. The shoes combine low ride with minimal cushioning and killer colorways. How does the Kyrie Low stack up? Here we go… One thing that has been consistent since day one is that Kyrie models will have great traction. The Kyrie Low doesn’t disappoint. Using a straight-line traction that is broken up and rotated in certain areas, the traction pattern mimics herringbone with the different angles and spacings — and its ability to grip in almost any environment. The spacing is wide enough that wiping was at an extreme minimum — maybe once a session — and the grip was stop-on-a-dime power. Changing direction was smooth and quick because the traction let go as soon as it grabbed. The Kyrie Low also uses the curved midsole/outsole tooling that first appeared in the Kyrie 4 and, again, once you get used to the “rolling” feeling the combination of rounded outsole and killer traction makes transitions smooth and fast. The only thing holding the Kyrie Low traction from Hall of Fame was the durability. I had two or three pieces of the pattern come off during testing, all done indoor, so outdoor is a definite no on the gum bottoms. Not sure about any solid colorways, but for the color tested, no way. For the first time ever, a Kyrie model uses both forefoot and heel Zoom Air for cushioning, and we should be excited — when done right, the 20-year-old technology is still one of the top cushioning systems ever made. Unfortunately, the Kyrie Low uses rectangle bags that are bottom-loaded, so the Zoom feel isn’t really there. The bags aren’t exceptionally thin (7mm thick in the forefoot and a serious14mm in the heel), but the stiff Phylon midsole deadens the initial bounce and response you would normally feel. So how did the Kyrie Low get a Starting 5 rating? Simple: it works great on court. With the killer traction and the idea that this shoe is made for quicker players who cut and shift, the stiff midsole doesn’t compress and cause lag time between movements. With the Zoom being bottom-loaded, you don’t get the feel underfoot of a good Zoom, but the impact is absorbed and deadened through the Phylon as well. The cushioning works with the traction to make the Kyrie Low feel low and fast, so it’s doing its job. As I have gotten older, I know my knees and ankles need a little more protection, but for the design of the Kyrie Low, the cushioning works great. Ahhh, yes, the lovely mesh and fuse upper. The colorway tested (the ‘Uncle Drew’ grey/royal/gum) has a heavily glued, canvas-style fabric that took some serious break-in time. Even after a few wears, there were still some hotspots around my toes and the upper made a popping feel when flexing my foot. The medial and strap Swoosh are leather, or at least a really good synthetic that add a little premium feel (the black and white colorways are TPU/plastic). There are some areas of fuse around the toebox for a little extra durability. While the upper is made up of one primary material with no layering except for the strap, Nike did put some effort into design with the molded heel counter. Mimicking the spiked look from the Kyrie 1, the Kyrie Low uses a molded heel counter underneath the fabric to push the look. In this colorway, the strap gets the same treatment, and although it adds nothing to performance, it does a great job in breaking up the upper and giving some texture to the design. I have held the black and white uppers in-hand (and might possibly pick up the white colorway soon) and they’re made of a different mesh (something more like the Kyrie 3) that is more pliable and feels better to the touch. If you are looking for a ready-to-go upper out of the box, I suggest one of those colorways. Length and width-wise, the Kyrie Low fits true to size — if you wore a 10.5 in the Kyrie 1-3, get a 10.5 in the Low (the Kyrie 4 fit me a little short so I went up a half size). The midfoot is a little narrow, so if you are a wide-footer or like a little extra space to double sock you may want to go up a half size or try on in-store (the Kyrie Low is everywhere). The lacing system is the exact same used on the Kyrie 2 with a little diagonal offset on the lace holes. Overall, the shoe pulls nice and tight around your foot, locking everything from the midfoot forward in and down with no movement at all. The heel had a little bit of slip until the upper broke down a little, but after the materials loosened up the heel slip went away…for the most part. The open Achilles area leaves the top of the collar a little wide, leading to that slip, and the heel counter is solid so the little bit of slip that is left is no worries. First off, the strap does nothing. It makes the midfoot feel a little tighter, but as far as playability, it adds nothing. Looks cool, though. The main support components are not blatant — subtlety is key. The low-riding midsole and the lacing system are all you need. The rounded outsole takes a little time to get used to if you haven’t played in a Kyrie before (and thankfully it doesn’t feel at wobbly as the Kyrie 2) but once you do the feeling is controlled during movement. With the lacing system locking you into the shoe and the foot sitting inside the midsole (not directly on it) you are not sliding anywhere you don’t want to. There is a midfoot shank in the Kyrie Low — the small, standard, hidden TPU kind — that provides a little midfoot support. The heel cup is solid and keeps your foot vertical. This should be enough for most players, even bigger post players, because the solid midsole doesn’t compress to the point of tipping — that helps keep your foot stable. While I enjoyed the overall cushioning in the Kyrie 4 more (Cushlon, where have you been?), I felt that the Kyrie 4 was bulky and traction took a while to get right. The Kyrie Low comes in a sleeker package with better traction but loses step-in comfort and responsive cushioning. If you are a quicker, shifty guard who loved the Kyrie 2 and 3, the Kyrie Low is a no-brainer. It’s package of traction, court feel, and fit make the shoe ideal for most guards and actually, any player not needing a wide shoe or supreme cushioning. If you play mostly outdoors, sorry, because like most shoes today you will want to stay away. To be honest, the first time I wore the Kyrie Low I was almost determined not to like it — it felt stiff and way too solid underfoot for me to enjoy playing in. Luckily, the shoe began to warm up to me and broke in nicely, both in the midsole and the upper. The KD 11 has become a solid rotation shoe that I can count on. Now if I could just get this old guy off my porch to quit screaming, “You reach I teach, youngblood!!”
12:44:40 15 Augustus 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)


Two of Nike’s biggest releases of 2018 thus far, has been Sean Wotherspoon’s Air Max 1/97 and Virgil Abloh’s Off-White x Nike Air Presto. Sean Wotherspoon’s Air Max was the winning design from the RevolutionAIR voting campaign in early 2017. It was a hybrid design of the Nike Air Max 97 upper built with corduroy atop the iconic tooling of the Air Max 1. During March, Nike Air Max fans got to cast their vote part of the ‘RevolutionAir’ design. The winner would have his or her Air Max model put in production. The end result was Sean Wotherspoon’s Nike Air Max which is a hybrid model of the Nike Air Max 97 and the Nike Air Max 1. Inspiration behind his pair is due to his love of vintage Nike hats from the 1980s. This Nike Air Max 97/1 Hybrid features corduroy on the uppers, frayed edges, velour on the toe that extends to the heel while a unique design lands on the insoles. Virgil Abloh not only released one, but two Off-White colorways of the Nike Air Presto. One of those was the “Black” iteration that came in its signature deconstructed build. This Nike Air Presto by Off-White comes dressed in a ’Triple Black’ color theme while accents of White and Cone are used. In addition we have the stitched Nike Swoosh logos, Orange tab and Off-White text which completes the look. While both pairs were highly demanded, which would you consider was the better release? Cast your vote below, and leave your thoughts in the comments section.
12:44:43 13 Augustus 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

The Nike Hyperdunk X Deconstructed


The Hyperdunk X celebrates a decade since the line began in 2008. Thus, you won’t find anything new in this Nike Hyperdunk X deconstruction. Like past setups — most recently the Hyperdunk 2016 — the Hyperdunk X features heel and forefoot Zoom Air units; this offers impact protection at the heel and responsiveness at the forefoot. However, what’s notable in this latest Hyperdunk is just how much Zoom we’re getting. The heel Zoom Air unit in the Hyperdunk X is 14.10mm thick — that’s nearly double the 8.20mm thick heel unit in the Hyperdunk 2016 (scroll down to the bottom for a comparison). The forefoot unit is only 6.87mm thick, on-par with what we’ve seen in several Nike Basketball models. The units are top-loaded and protected via small 1.24mm thick windows that create 7-8mm gaps between the unit and the outsole. Gone is the React foam from the Hyperdunk 2017, which many of our kd11sale.com thought was lackluster in its basketball implementation, but the small support plate at the midfoot (used in past Hyperdunk models) is back.
Moreover, it looks like wearers will sit within this tooling, although it is a bit higher off the ground than past Basketball Shoes models. Beneath the thick insole is a layer of white EVA that shows the tooling’s curvature around the foot. Finally, the upper of the Hyperdunk X is minimal and seems to be designed for breathability. A fairly open-celled mesh is backed by a thin film for reinforcement while the toe (above the mesh) is covered in fuse/TPU to protect against toe-drags. The Nike Hyperdunk X has retained its $130 price point and is available now at Nike.com in both men’s and women’s sizes. Did you notice anything unusual in this Nike Hyperdunk X deconstruction? Let us know in the comments below.

12:24:47 08 Augustus 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)


Jordan Brand as used the Air Jordan 4 in some of the most recent bigger collaborations by hooking up with KAWS on two colorways as most recently with Levi’s. The Levi’s x Air Jordan 4 Denim is part of the upcoming Levi’s x Air Jordan 4 Collection which will release during 2018 This isn’t the first time that Levi’s and Jordan Brand collaborated, the first time was on the Levi’s x Air Jordan 1 Pack which also came with a pair of jeans. This took place in 2008 marking its 10th Anniversary. This Air Jordan 4 is highlighted in Blue Denim across the uppers while Tan and Red detailing is seen throughout. Following we have a bit of White on the midsole and Gum on the outsole. Finishing the look is Levi’s branding on the insoles. The Black KAWS Air Jordan 4 was the more limited pair out of the two, first appearing as a friends and family edition. The KAWS Air Jordan 4 Black will release during November part of Jordan Brand’s Holiday lineup. This marks the second collaboration between KAWS and Jordan Brand on the Jordan 4 which will launch on Cyber Monday. This Air Jordan 4 by KAWS comes dressed in predominate Black while premium suede runs throughout. Following we have his trademark Mickey Mouse like hands stitched while the ‘XX’ logo is seen on the heel. Other details includes the Jumpman x KAWS branding on the insoles while a Glow in the Dark outsole completes the look. Kicking of 2018, Jordan Brand and Levi’s dropped their Air Jordan 4 collaboration in its first of three colorways covered in full denim. If you have both pairs in your collection, consider yourself lucky. Looking back, which would you say was the better release? Cast your vote below and leave your thoughts in the comments section.
12:11:45 02 Augustus 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

Nike KD 5 Performance Review


They got it right on the money this time. Leo Chang deserves a round of applause for this one. Traction – While these perform great on clean courts – as most shoes do – they were surprisingly good on dusty floors as well even with the story telling pattern. Luckily they went with a much more pliable rubber compound with the KD V versus the KD 11 so you have plenty of friction between your foot and the hardwood. As a fast paced PG… I thought these were fantastic. Cushion – Give them time to break-in and you’ll eventually fall in love with them. I personally would have liked to have fallen in love with them right from the start but impressing me each and every time I finished running in them was actually something I enjoyed as well. The 10mm forefoot Zoom unit was a nice change of pace – usually the KD signature has a much thinner Zoom unit – and the heel Air unit was a nice addition as well. What I thought was most important was their choice in foam as that can make or break almost any cushion source since it rest directly under foot. This foam breaks in nicely and feels better with each and every wear… not something I experienced with the KD IV. Material – Fuse is placed along the upper – a very thin layer by the way – and feels great as it wraps around the foot nicely. It still retains its shape better than any other material that we’ve seen placed on a performance sneaker and can withstand heavy beatings. You really can’t go wrong with Nike’s modern Fuse base… it’s probably one of the best synthetics around for performance footwear. Fit – You like wearing socks right? That’s how these feel on your feet. Like I noted above, the upper wraps your foot up perfectly and once the break-in period is complete you have a sneaker that will last and feel great on foot. I personal feel going ½ size down was appropriate but try them on yourself if possible just to be sure you get the correct size. Lockdown isn’t an issue in any area of the shoe. Midfoot lockdown is perfect, there is zero dead space at the forefoot and the heel fits perfectly and keeps you secured in place. I didn’t even have to use all the eyelets in order to achieve perfect lockdown so it felt as if I was wearing a low top even though these are mids/ highs. Ventilation – There isn’t much ventilation but with the materials used and the superb fit, their performance isn’t hindered one bit. Basically, if you feel your ‘feet get too hot’ when playing, you either should look at something else entirely or take care of that athletes foot. Support – Because the fit and lockdown are so great, the support is awesome. Keeping you secure in the shoe without movement provides you with all the support one would need without adding extra material. Having a lateral outrigger and stable base just improve the support by giving you some additional stability. Overall – This is one hell of a shoes . Talk about bang for your buck too… at $115 these are a steal. Just make sure you can handle the break-in process and you will love these the way you do your favorite pair of jeans.
12:34:06 31 Juli 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

Air Jordan XVII (17) Retro Performance Review


Jazz it up....

Traction – This is how you pull off a storytelling traction surface. The entire design is based on MJ’s love for Golf and instead of using some random pattern they went with herringbone – which worked really well. They used contrasting colors to add additional effects without sacrificing coverage. Now, I will say that the traction wasn’t perfect but it was pretty damn close. Only time I had an issue was during certain movements where the shoe flexed at a point where the traction wasn’t in contact with the floor so I had slight slippage but that didn’t happen often so it was nothing crazy… very minor and its the only thing I experienced that I could nit-pick on.

Cushion – This air jordan 17 shoes was built for an aging MJ that required quite a bit of support in order for his knees to hold up on-court. There was a blow molded Air unit in place at the heel – I still don’t know the difference between blow molded Air units vs a regular one – which was housed within a giant TPU (plastic) cage. The entire heel area reminded me a lot of caged Zoom Air but firmer. Was it incredibly uncomfortable? No, but it wasn’t what I’ve been used to with previous Air setups. However, forefoot cushion was fantastic. Zoom Air is placed at the forefoot and the entire forefoot section of the shoe is built traditionally with a Phylon footbed which happens to be double lasted. Its a really interesting way to construct a shoe where you have incredible support with adequate cushion.

Material – I love the materials used on this 2008 CDP version and especially the originals which featured buttery leather uppers. This pair utilizes a nice nubuck at the heel and forefoot. This has its strong points and weak points. Its strength is its fit and feel along with the minimal break-in time required. As for the weakness… its just not as durable as leather overall but again… that’s me nitpicking since the materials are really nice in general. There is a section of woven material – identical to what was used on the LeBron 9’s support wings – at the midfoot that offers great fit and its the most durable section of the upper. My favorite material used is located at the collar… the Neoprene lining is so comfortable it makes all other collars seem inferior.

Fit – They fit true to size and lockdown for me was near perfect. Only gripe is that I had to lace them all the way to the top eyelet and I usually leave one or two free so I have better range of motion for my ankles. I couldn’t do that with these since every time I tried my heel would flop in and out of the shoe a bit but once laced them up the way they were intended then they were perfectly fine. The midfoot lockdown was fantastic and you even have additional lacing options if you wish with the Shroud’s ‘eyelet’ system for a more snug fit. We also have a squared toe again so that area of the shoe is very comfortable while stoping and changing direction without jamming any toes.

Support – As mentioned earlier, this shoe was designed for an aging MJ that needed more support than his past models provided. The TPU heel, lacing system and Carbon Fiber plate running throughout the entire outsole provided some of the best support I’ve had in any Air Jordan 1 to date… almost topping the XX8. Only reason why I’d personally choose the XX8 over these is due to the fact that they offer support that wont restrict my movement at all while these are a bit more restrictive overall.

Overall – This was probably the one shoe – besides the kd 11 – that I was looking forward to wearing the least. I don’t know why… I’ve just never been entirely enthusiastic about the model in general. After playing in them they’ve actually surpassed my initial impression and are among the top performance models featured within the Air Jordan Legacy. This is definitely one model that I’d love to see get the Retro treatment as they are 100% playable even by today’s standards. Truly an innovative sneaker that was ahead of its time.


12:08:11 26 Juli 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

Nike KD 8 Performance Review


Traction – How do you top the KD7’s traction? Simply put… this is how. It’s a modified herringbone pattern that looks as if it’s been digitized. Suffice to say, they played really great on every floor I played on. Only when the local 24 Hour Super Sport showed they desperately needed to clean the floor did I get any slippage, but even with the debris it was more reliable than other traction patterns I’ve used. Only reason why I won’t give them a Hall of Fame badge is because the rubber used is soft and is already fraying after a solid week of use. So, the down side is their potential durability, but while they last you’ll have some awesome grip. Cushion – A new full length articulated Zoom Air unit was created for the KD 8, and it looks extremely similar to one I designed way back when I reviewed the Nike LeBron 15 . How does the full length Zoom feel? Well…you can’t really feel it most of the time. The main section under the ball of the foot feels amazing – super springy and explosive – but the rest is braced by additional rubber or plastic to keep the bag from compressing and becoming unstable. So while you receive some nice full length cushion that flexes better than previously used full length Air units, I think it could have been implemented a bit better. Personally, I would have encapsulated the cushion while retaining its flex grooves. Basically make it so that the cushion isn’t visible–the same way the Air Jordan 12 did. It’d still flex and move, but it’d be set directly under foot so you could feel the cushion and responsiveness without risking any instability. Either way, you don’t come across full length cushion like this, from Nike, at this price point anymore…and that’s saying something since these things are pretty damn expensive. Materials – They’ve renamed it Flyweave, but it’s basically the performance woven material that made it’s debut in the air Jordan xx9. It’s awesome. Period. You used to have to pay $225 if you wanted to try out Jordan Brand’s performance woven upper, but now you can try it out for less ($180). Yes, you can currently find the Air Jordan xx9 for under retail, but they don’t come with full length cushion and a performance woven upper like these do. Yeah, +1 for the KD8. The only drawback to a woven upper is durability. So if you’re worried about the potential longevity of your shoes then staying away from softer upper materials would be best. If you grab a shoe with mesh, woven etc. along the upper then don’t complain if they eventually tear… It’s to be expected at some point. Fit – Their fit is a little tricky. I went up half a size. And I usually never do that so I’d recommend trying them on. They reminded me a lot of the KD5 at first because the tongue is attached to the upper and your foot can definitely feel that upon putting them on. The difference though, these use a woven upper instead of plastic so they break-in in no time. Lockdown is solid as well. The forefoot is pretty snug to ensure that secure fit, while Flywire is in place to help reinforce the area upon lateral movements. Having the Flywire in this specific location might actually alleviate some of the pressure the woven will face while being played in, so it may help it last a bit longer. In the heel there is an internal heel counter that works great, and the interior padding is really nicely sculpted to help keep things secure. Those saber tooth phylon pieces don’t really do any of the supporting though; they’re too thin and are basically there for storytelling purposes only. Support – Similar to the Zoom Soldier 9, there are support features all over the KD 11. The first, and most obvious, is their form fitting upper. The more natural your foot and the shoe adhere to one another the better the support will be. Then there’s the huge platform the shoe is built on. The Zoom unit is flat and wide, instability is pretty much a non issue here. Any potential instability would have come from the exposed zoom air unit, but like I described in the cushion section, there are support piece in place to ensure the bag won’t fold or collapse when you’re playing so you’re covered from every angle. If you wanted to see the support pieces I’m talking about then check the video, it’s a little hard to write and describe each area without putting you to sleep… if you’re even awake at this point anyway. Something I personally disliked was the large exaggerated heel. It sticks out way too far and while it never obstructed transition like I initially thought it might, instead it just made it really easy for someone to step on me and take my shoe completely off. Getting flat-tired in a game usually doesn’t happen, but in these it happened more than it should have. Overall – I really enjoyed the shoe on-court. They have some beastly traction and full coverage cushion. The woven upper is something that I personally love, and I hope others enjoy it as much as I do. As long as you get your the size that’ll fit you properly, support will be amazing. The KD 8 is right up there with the KD 5 and 7 in terms of on-court performance – all three are really awesome 0n-court. Hopefully they continue to get better each year…KD deserves a great performance shoe, and so do those that buy his kicks.
12:34:30 24 Juli 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

Nike KD 7 Performance Review


One of the most well-rounded hoop shoes from Nike in quite some time… that isn’t a Hyperdunk. Traction – The traction was awesome, especially when comparing them to the KD Shoes. This is one instance where story telling patterns work, and in this case… work really well. While these aren’t as grippy as the Kobe 1 protro or Jordan XX8, they get the job done without issue. Maybe the occasional wipe here and there if the floor is a bit dusty, but otherwise they’re perfectly fine. Something that some people will like is that they perform well outdoors and will hold up a little longer than the Kobe and Jordan models. Cushion – Max Zoom in the heel and 8mm Zoom in the forefoot… super comfy. I really love Max Zoom but when implemented full length, you tend to lose a lot of mobility. This setup perfectly blends the older styled Zoom with the new styled Zoom for the ultimate ride. Materials – HyperRev up front and Foamposite in the back… thats pretty much what they remind me of. I love mesh and the freedom/ mobility it offers the wearer, however, you lose support when mesh is used from heel to toe. This is where blending the two materials works really well together. With the Foamposite heel, you received structure and support where you need it most while the mesh forefoot offers a pain-free and mobile experience. Only thing you can complain about would be the mesh and how it lacks durability… but it’s some comfortable that I’d still prefer this over Fuse any day of the week. Fit – They literally fit me perfectly. I’ve heard that there are heel issues, pain where the midfoot strap is located and that they run big and small. But for me, they fit true to size and they’re the first KD model since the 3 that doesn’t hurt anywhere when worn. I also felt lockdown was really solid. Heel lockdown and security was great as the Foamposite restricts your heel from moving or shifting around the shoe so you’re secure while playing. The mesh starts off snug but breaks in quickly and once that happens you’ll want to tie your laces up a bit tighter which allows the Dynamic Flywire to do it’s thing. Ventilation – The ventilation is decent. Nothing great but nothing horrible. In fact, these are probably the best use of ventilation I’ve seen without losing any structure or support – other than the UA Spawn. Heat can escape the forefoot while the heel holds in the heat so the Foam can mold as quickly as possible. Support – The fit offers the greatest amount of support but there is also a new feature in place as well. Instead of a traditional shank, the KD 7 features support bars or beams right where your metatarsal bones are located. Basically, they mimic the bodies natural support features and they do so pretty effectively without adding additional weight or bulk. Overall This is my new favorite hoop shoe of the year, so far. I’m expecting that to change once I play in the XX9 but as of right now, these are freaking sweet! They are really well rounded, just like the UA Spawn, in nearly every category. I also love that they fit true to size and didn’t hurt or pinch my feet anywhere. Definitely the best KD model besides the 5, and if you’re looking for an eclectic assortment of Nike tech rolled into one model – the KD 11 Sale does that and somehow makes it all work
12:50:57 23 Juli 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)


Two original releases of the Air Jordan 13, which are considered two of the fan favorites, are the “He Got Game” and “Bred” colorways. Dressed in a White, Black and Red color scheme that received its nickname “He Got Game” thanks to its appearance in Spike Lee’s classic basketball film. It’s safe to say that no Air Jordan Collection is completed without this colorway. The “Bred” version is one of the original Air Jordan 13 colorways that was worn by Michael Jordan in the 1998 Playoffs along with the other Black-based colorway dubbed, “Playoffs.” The Jordan 13 Bred dropped in 2013 but ditched the reflective 3M upper that made it such a standout release when it debuted back in 1998. Luckily the nylon uppers return paired with Varsity Red suede on the heel and mudguard for a traditional Chicago Bulls-inspire colorway,. All of the original tooling remains including that Chicago Bulls-inspired colorway with Varsity Red suede on the heel and mudguard while that holographic panther-inspired Jumpman branding returns in an iridescent green. Premium leather toe caps add a remastered finish. The air jordan 13 He Got Game made iconic by Spike Lee’s classic 1998 film of the same name. 20 years after first being brought to market, the shoe is re-releasing with all its original details intact, from the white/black tumbled leather upper to the rich suede on the bottom half of the upper to the classic red/white/black podular outsole and holographic bubble. the “He Got Game” 13 features a white tumbled leather upper with accents provided by a black tumbled leather toebox, tongue, and throat. Black suede arrives on the lateral and medial side of the shoe, as well as the heel collar and midsole, and the outsole features a classic red/white/black design. The shoe’s instantly recognizable look is rounded off by the Jordan 13’s classic multi-layered 3D hologram bubble It’s defiantly a hard choice to pick one or the other, but if you had to choose, which is the better Air Jordan 13? Cast your vote below and leave your reasoning on why in the comments section. It also should be noted that Jordan Brand is bridging back the Air Jordan 13 He Got Game this August 2018.
11:43:46 20 Juli 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

Nike KD 11 Performance Review


The Nike KD 11, with its combination of React and Zoom, had me all up in my feels. But did the shoe live up to the standards of a two-time NBA champ? Let’s find out. Traction in the KD11 was decent at best. It’s no KD 9 honeycomb traction (which was amazing), and due to the tight grooves, dust collected quickly which caused more frequent wipes. The outsole consistency over the few years of Kevin Durant’s signature line has been quite disappointing — especially coming from previously great models — unless you have access to a pristine college/NBA court. One redeeming quality of the outsole is that if you use the shoe outdoors, it plays really well. Unfortunately, long-term durability of the outsole outdoors is unlikely. Cushion was on point in the KD 11, once broken in. The React midsole is placed inside a rubber cupsole while the 7mm thick top-loaded full-length Zoom Air unit sits above the React. The combination provides an awesome amount of impact protection. Upon landing on rebounds and hard first steps I felt ample feedback that launched me right into my next motion. For those who require more cushion (especially those with back and knee problems), this is definitely a plus. Another year, another Flyknit shoe, which is generally never a bad thing. The uppers of the KD line have been modified over the years to make the shoe feel more sock-like. With some suede backing along the heel counter, TPU at the lateral side, and React and Zoom Air cushion caged by a full rubber cupsole, you’d think you’re paying for a premium shoe. The combination of the materials used on the KD 11 appears to be geared to Durant’s narrow foot and this shoe should cater to those who want their footwear to feel the same way. We’ll discuss that more in the next section, however, the materials utilized are well-thought out — just not well-executed. While I do have slightly wide feet, the shoe actually fit me true to size, although people with different foot shapes should try the KD11 on. Once I got rolling on the court I was not locked in. You don’t feel quite as locked in because, again, the shoe is catered to the way Kevin Durant likes to lace up his shoes (which is slightly loose). I think if Nike strategically knitted areas of the shoe tighter, like at the midfoot, I wouldn’t have felt my foot shifting inside the shoe as I did much while in movement. You might not have this experience (which I hope you don’t), but be forewarned because the knit material does stretch out over time. NOPE! Just nope! While the fit wasn’t totally a deal breaker, the overall support is. Knowing that the upper material will eventually stretch out, the one thing that kills me is that my foot wouldn’t stay on the footbed of the shoe. I have no idea how to pull off the cuts Durant makes on his right to left cross-over pull-up move when I don’t feel like my foot is directly in the KD11. If you’re just running up and down the court without making any lateral cuts or movements (which is totally unheard of) then you’d be just some guy or gal running for no apparent reason. The amount of torque and movement I exerted in the shoe — while not feeling locked in — made me second and triple guess every move I made, which no player should have to deal with. When my feet got pushed forward in the shoe the stretchy knit upper could not keep me contained and thus, the heel counter did not lock me in properly. I would expect a more exaggerated outrigger, and although an outrigger is present, the high ride and stretchy upper had me coming out of the shoe. For others, it could lead to a rolled ankle, or *knock on wood*, something worse. In the KD11 it seems containment was an afterthought. If Nike had implemented a more tightly knitted midfoot, an exaggerated lateral outrigger, or sat the wearer within the midsole, most of these hazards would have been avoided. I wanted to love the KD11. While I had bad experiences with the KD9 (Zoom popped) and the KD10 (lacing loops ripped), I didn’t want to give up on the KD signature line. The safety of this shoe is what is keeping me away from it. While the materials and cushioning used here are nice, I don’t see how this shoe made it through wear-testing. I understand the shoe is catered to Kevin Durant, but we all know KD dislikes changing shoes — especially ones he’s broken in — and not all consumers have narrow feet like KD. Innovation shouldn’t come at a cost, and the KD11 seems to be the prime example of that. Trust me, I want the shoes to succeed, not only for us kd11sale.com but also for all you consumers out there. Will I be looking forward to the KD12? Possibly, as long as I keep my expectations low, but we all know father-time doesn’t wait for anyone. Until next time…
13:31:07 19 Juli 2018 Permanente link Reacties (0)

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